Several rare species spotted – Check out our latest camera trap footage!

 

As a part of our Wildlife Monitoring Project, we have 15 motion triggered camera traps located deep in the jungle of Khao Sok National Park and Klong Saeng Wildlife Sanctuary. Some of the wildlife, especially the Felidae family (cats) that we are currently focusing on, are very sensitive for unusual scents and human presence. Therefore we usually leave the camera traps in the forest for at least a couple of months.

It was time to change the memory cards and batteries, do some basic maintenance and adjust locations of the camera traps. We set for Elephant Hills Rainforest Camp, getting ready for the 7-hour hike with our Wildlife Monitoring Project team. In the beginning of this trip we were slightly cautious, because during the morning brief the ranger accompanying us had informed that there has been a herd of wild elephants roaming in the area recently.

Following the direction given by our GPS device showing the locations of each carefully positioned camera trap, we made our way through the jungle. We passed pathways and corridors that were clearly frequented by wildlife, and made several plaster casts of interesting footprints. When arriving to a beautiful, remote waterfall the ranger walking in the front suddenly stopped. He lifted his hand up and gestured us to stop walking as he had spotted a large animal hiding in the forest, just 20 meters in front of us. We remembered his earlier advice on the wild elephants, and were thinking of where to hide, until we saw the tall male sambar deer quickly jumping away.

Our next surprise was just behind the corner, as we found one of the most remote camera traps completely destroyed. We couldn’t specify what animal had attacked it, but based on our previous experience we are suspecting a wild elephant. When the motion triggered cameras are filming, there is a tiny little red light blinking in the front, which can sometimes attract the animals to make closer acquaintance with the cameras.

Although we were left with just 14 cameras after one being destroyed, back at the office we were very pleased to go through the footage. We were able to capture as many as 27 different species roaming in the jungle, including three species of cats! We have selected the best shots for you, so sit back, relax and enjoy marveling at the amazing wildlife of Khao Sok National Park.

 

Learn more about our Wildlife Monitoring Project here. By gathering information on the flora and fauna in Khao Sok, we believe we can help the National Parks and Wildlife Sanctuaries with their continuous efforts on preserving this unique area. We are currently looking for partners to co-operate with our Wildlife Monitoring Project. If you or your company would be interested, please contact us at projects@elephanthills.com.

 

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